The Fifth Angel Review
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What would you do if a man kidnapped, raped and brutalized a woman you loved? Imagine if she was your daughter, wife or sister, and the case against the rapist is solid.

Then one day prior to the trial, a judge decides not to allow crucial evidence because of a technical loophole. Your family is advised that the perpetrator will go to jail, but it will be for a much lesser charge.

This is the question that The Fifth Angel, by author Tim Green, poses. The two main characters in this suspenseful drama are attorney Jack Ruskin and FBI agent Amanda Lee. Ruskinís daughter was the victim of a brutal rape. It is in the beginning of the book that we see her attackerís trial changed by a judgeís decision to throw out evidence.

Tha
  
 
t decision pushes Ruskin to the edge. His wife has left, his daughter is in an institution, and he blames himself for all of it. In the face of injustice, Ruskin decides that someone must take out the child predators of the world. It starts as an intricate and well thought out plan, and we watch as the risks escalate after each successful attack. Itís interesting to watch Ruskinís character as he grows. Greenís knowledge of the law makes Ruskinís preparations authentic, and his role as a father makes Ruskinís inner voice and his pain real.

Amanda Lee (the FBI agent) is also dealing with emotional baggage. Having recently lost her partner, sheís struggling to find a balance between her job and her family. The struggle is more difficult because she is an excellent agent, but her husband fails to recognize and support that. Lee also has two kids whom she wants to be there for, but it is not always possible because of her field work. All of these factors provide a story within the story, and Leeís story adds an interesting twist as the novel builds towards the final climax.

Itís fun to see how Green adds pieces from his own life into the book. For example, he places a scene in the law firm of Hiscock and Barclay, which is the same firm where the author actually practices law.

Green provides his readers with a well-crafted story, and every character adds flavor to the main narrative. He takes time to go back and forth between Ruskin and Lee, and builds the story to a great moment of final justice. The ending is truly heartwarming and realistic.



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