The Everything Dreams Book Review
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I was a little bit skeptical when I started reading this book's Dream Glossary. (Okay, I started reading the end of the book first.) I looked up some of the common subjects of dreams I had, like spiders. Apparently ďspiders may symbolize a careful and energetic approach to your work and that you will be pleasantly rewarded for your labors.Ē I had to disagree with this one. I think dreaming about spiders probably means Iím freaked out about spiders.

When I started at the beginning of the book, though, I found my explanation. The author explains that there are different types of dreams, including release dreams, wish dreams, and prophetic dreams. My spider dream would fall under the category of release dreams, where Iím attempting to release the fear, insecurity, or frustration from my life. The author also states that an object in a dream may mean one thing to one person but something entirely different to someone else. This made a lot more sense to me. As I continued to read, I found out the different characteristics of each type of dream and how to recognize the differences between them. For instance, a prophetic (or psychic) message dream would have a logical, sequential order to it, whereas a wish dream would not.

  
 
The title for this book is very suitable because it gives you more information than you would normally find in dream books. It talks about theories from Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung and gives you ideas on how to remember your dreams. Without even recording them, my dreams became more vivid, and I remembered more of them, just by lying quietly and thinking about them after I woke up. The book also provides theories and techniques on how to fly in your dreams, how to visit somewhere or someone (astral travel), and how to achieve out-of-body travel. I havenít tried any of these yet, but the author backs them up with pretty believable stories.

The only thing I find lacking in this book is the Dream Glossary. It goes against the idea of the book that things in your dream mean whatever you think they mean. I also tried looking up a lot of things in the glossary that werenít there. Understandably, you canít have everything from everyoneís dreams in a glossary, but the 12 months of the year (every single month), ketchup, and milk, donít seem to be in the forefront of my dreams. Maybe they are in other peopleís dreams. Who knows?

If you'd like to remember your dreams and understand what they mean, The Everything Dreams Book is the perfect place to start. Just don't rely too heavily on the Dream Glossary.

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