Hit and Run Review
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After an intruder attacks her in her home, Jilly Carson suffers a spontaneous abortion and reaches out to her twin sister, Beth, through the psychic connection they share. Jilly believes the man who put her in the hospital is her husband, Keith, who is angry over the pregnancy—and because Jilly wouldn’t give him $500,000 from her inheritance without him telling her why.

Beth urges Jilly to press charges, but she figures Keith will leave her alone after she files for divorce. Jilly doesn’t take Keith’s threats seriously, and it costs Jilly her life.

Convinced Keith killed her sister, Beth sets out to find proof—and she tries to convince Detective Ryan Snider to believe that Jilly still talks to her from beyond the grave. Jilly saw the face of the man who ran her down in the street, but Ryan can’t arrest someone based on a psychic connection. Jilly warns Beth to be careful—because someone wants her dead, and he’s beginning to stalk her, playing with her until he moves in for the kill. Beth goes to her father’s cabin to rest and regroup, but an old flame starts calling her, and Beth becomes unsure who is after her and why.

  
 
Hit and Run is a quick, time-killing read. I started it before work, and then I finished it after work. The story premise is a good one, but once I started reading, the tale didn’t grab me. Don’t expect any surprises here. You know who the killer is and why he’s after Beth; you just don’t know how he’ll be stopped, and that will keep you reading if nothing else will. The old flame turns out to be a weak diversion, and doesn't really add to the plot.

The story picks up a little once Beth arrives at the cabin. I could vividly imagine the dock, lake, and surrounding area; and I even felt the warmth of the sun on my skin when Beth fell asleep on the dock. Ms. Erhardt definitely has some talent for sensory details.

The romance between Ryan and Beth contains a few clichés, though—violin music over dinner, the heroine twisting her ankle and falling against the hero, gazes meeting and locking, etc. I really liked the storyline, but Ms. Erhardt didn’t do it justice. Still, Hit and Run is a good read to pass the time if you’re stranded somewhere and need something to entertain you for a while.

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