Back to the Future Review
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It may not have won the Oscar for Best Picture—heck, it wasn’t even nominated—but, back in 1985, Back to the Future took movie theaters around the world by storm. While many summer hits tend to fade into obscurity as the years pass, though, this sci-fi adventure comedy has stood the test of time, successfully transitioning from summer blockbuster to old favorite to ‘80s icon. And if it’s been a while since you last saw it, it’s well worth the trip back in time to enjoy this lovable ‘80s adventure all over again.

Michael J. Fox’s Marty McFly is the typical ‘80s American teenager. He loves rock ‘n’ roll, skateboarding, and his girlfriend, Jennifer (Claudia Wells). He thinks his mom (Lea Thompson) is too strict and his dad (Crispin Glover) is too weak—and he dreams of making more of his life than his old man did. But everything changes for Marty when his crazy old friend, Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd), unveils his latest scientific experiment: a time-traveling DeLorian.

  
 
After being chased by angry Libyan nationals who are after the plutonium that’s powering the machine, Marty accidentally travels back in time 30 years, to 1955, where he inadvertently prevents his parents from falling in love. So while a young Doc Brown tries to find a way to get Marty back to the future, Marty has just one week to get his parents together—or he’ll cease to exist.

Looking back at this ‘80s favorite, it’s admittedly hard to separate Back to the Future from the nostalgia surrounding it. But there are plenty of reasons why Back to the Future is such a beloved classic—instead of, say, Tomboy.

For starters, there’s the story, which is so well-rounded that it’s almost impossible to categorize. It’s a sweet, suspenseful, light-hearted blend of science fiction, action, comedy, romance, and teen drama. It has plenty of old-school action and adventure, but it also tells a captivating story about a teenager going back in time to see what his parents were really like when they were his age.

With its clever ‘80s twist on the stereotypical ‘50s innocence, Back to the Future shows that, deep down, teenagers are the same—whether they’re from 1955, 1985, or even 2010. They all share the same dreams, the same passions, the same anxieties. And that universal story makes it one that viewers of all ages can appreciate and enjoy.

Then, of course, there are the memorable performances. Fox is cute and charming and so very cool as everyteen Marty McFly—especially when you consider that, at the time, he was known for playing straight-laced, type-A overachiever Alex P. Keaton on the popular TV series Family Ties. But he’s not alone. Lloyd is unforgettable for his bug-eyed expressions and his wonderfully over-the-top portrayal of slightly-mad scientist Doc Brown. And let’s not forget Crispin Glover, who’s awkwardly adorable as poor, downtrodden George McFly.

Thanks to its relatable story, its lovable cast, and its pitch-perfect performances, Back to the Future is more than just a fun blast from the past. Sure, it’s a movie that will take you back to your teen years, but it’s also a movie that you can enjoy with your own teenagers. Just add some popcorn and a case of Tab for a fun movie night for the whole family.


Blu-ray Review:
Newly restored in celebration of its 25th anniversary, Back to the Future is as good as new again. The 25th anniversary Blu-ray release (included in the six-disc Back to the Future trilogy release) also comes complete with a mix of old and new extras. On the special features menu, you’ll find archival extras (like the original making-of feature), along with newer features (like an eight-part Q&A with Michael J. Fox) and brand-new ones (like three new Tales from the Future features, in which the cast and crew look back at everything from conception and casting to production and release). There are deleted scenes, outtakes, galleries, and two commentaries—and even more, if you have your player connected to the Internet.

For fans of the trilogy, this collection is a no-brainer. Not only can you enjoy the movies in all of their restored glory, but you can also peruse the extras to learn interesting little tidbits of trivia about everything from the music and the title to the casting dilemmas. You’ll even get a glimpse of Eric Stoltz as Marty McFly. It’s a must-own for any child of the ‘80s.

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