A Is for Alibi Review
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I’d been looking to find a cheap copy of “one of those alphabet mysteries” for a few years now. The problem wasn’t finding one, it was finding the right one—that is, the first one. I like to start these things at the beginning when possible.

My quest finally ended a month ago, leaving me to settle in and see what I thought of this beginning volume of the popular series. I can’t say I was that impressed by it when I finished.

I mostly had issues with the narrator. Since the narrator’s name was Kinsey, but it was only mentioned in passing on the back cover—not in the book itself for quite a few pages—and since the character was a private detective, I got confused. First I assumed the character was a man because of character traits and stereotype
  
 
s, then I wondered if he was a cross dresser or something when a few of the details swam into focus.

It was clear to me that I shouldn’t have been this confused—if the tone and characterization were clearer, I could have grasped it upfront. As it was, I didn’t get truly interested in the book until too late—although I did get into the plot eventually, I never got too attached to any of the characters. This was probably because, even after I figured out Kinsey was indeed a woman, I couldn’t relate to her very well.

So here’s the plot. Kinsey Millhone, a female private investigator, is hired by a rich woman who just got out of eight years of jail for the murder of her husband. Kinsey’s supposed to try to solve the eight-year-old murder to prove Nikki’s innocence. The problem, of course, is that it’s hard to find out stuff about old crimes and that Kinsey’s sources keep getting mysteriously tampered with.

I have to say that I’ve read much better mysteries. I recommend skipping this one.



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